Category: Fresh off the lab

5 (bio)-science trends to look out for in 2018

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What this is not, is an exhaustive list, as technological advancement has translated into a lot of development in health and science. What it is, however, is a list of things I intended to write on towards the end of 2017 but the universe rolled on too fast.

In no particular order:

  1. CAR-T therapy 

Continue reading “5 (bio)-science trends to look out for in 2018”

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HPV vaccines for people older than 26 years

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Human Pappilomavirus (HPV)  is responsible for over 90% of cervical cancer, genital warts and other cancers of the vulva, throat, anus, penis and vagina. HPV vaccines first came into the scene in 2006 and are currently available as Gardasil, Gardasil 9 and Cervarix. Continue reading “HPV vaccines for people older than 26 years”

7 facts about the recently discovered super gonorrhoea

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Antibiotic resistance is not a new phrase but it becomes alarming when all antibiotics become ineffective against a previously treatable STD (sexually transmitted disease).

 WHO estimates that each year, about 78 million people worldwide are infected with gonorrhea with most patients being under the age of 25. There are no published statistics for Kenya, but in 2014 the country was nominated as a regional surveillance hub for drug resistant gonorrhoea.

 

  1. Gonorrhea is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae. It is transmitted through unprotected vaginal, oral or anal sex with an infected person and also through sharing of sex toys.

Continue reading “7 facts about the recently discovered super gonorrhoea”

License acquired to modify human embryo genes

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On the 1st of February, scientists at the London-based Francis Crick Institute were given permission by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) to genetically alter human embryos.

Before you draw out the placards… there are regulations. Continue reading “License acquired to modify human embryo genes”

The fertility biological clock: 21st century myth?

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‘Biological clock’: a term widely used by society to refer to the diminishing ovarian reserve in women since the 1950’s. It has been well known that the human ovary has a finite number of eggs and no new eggs are formed during the course of a woman’s life.

Some time back in 2012, stem cells were discovered in human ovaries following an observation of the same in mice ovaries. The division of these stem cells suggested that new eggs could be formed – making it biologically sensible as sperm is continuously replenished. Continue reading “The fertility biological clock: 21st century myth?”